A River Runs Through It…the hypocrisy, that is.

So there I was today, between meetings, sitting in the Espresso Cafe in Newton – which incidentally has the best coffee I’ve found in Surrey. Deep rich flavour, none of that burnt bitterness I often find at the red cup chain that shall not be named.

But I digress. There I was, sitting and drinking my coffee, when I saw a Province paper.Not having read one in I don’t know how long, I picked it up to leaf through when something jumped right out at me within the first few pages.
2015-11-30 002

That’s the good-looking version on the nice tablecloth… this is the real document at the BC Utilities Commission website : http://www.bcuc.com/Documents/Proceedings/2015/DOC_45125_A-2_G-182-15_RegTimetable.pdf



The full meal deal on this project is here:  http://www.bcuc.com/ApplicationView.aspx?ApplicationId=518

Basically, there are issues with a failed rock armour layer at the WAC Bennett dam –  also on the Peace River – that impacts long term erosion control;the same kind of erosion issues that have concerned Site C critics and have been overlooked by many.

And because the BC Utilities Commission is  the oversight agency that was created to assess these kinds of projects to ensure they are needed and how they will impact BC Hydro rates, this project has gone before the commission and it was deemed a public hearing was needed.

Rightfully so – this is the only check and balance British Columbians have to ensure their best interest with regards to energy projects and BC Hydro rates. 

But the glaring hypocrisy of this project going through the proper process created by the province itself… when the BC  Liberal government and energy minister Bill Bennett exempted a much larger,far more expensive and un-needed project like Site C, is stark!

Now, any person with a stick of commonsense would ask why any government would remove a multi billion dollar project from the regular process. And then follow that same process for a much smaller maintenance issue on a dam, on the same river. Because to me, it just does not make sense.

I was tremendously disappointed to hear the announcement awarding initial contracts for Site C last week, in part because it has not gone through the same process dictated above. No review, no public hearing by the BC Utilities Commission. And the composition of the partnership will be subject for another post ,but right now this is just outrageous.

If the province really believes this project is the right one, for the right reasons,then let due process occur. But I will again point out the very telling statement Bill Bennett made in an interview with the Globe and Mail: 


And I call now on the new federal government and environment minister to reveal the reasons why the former government claimed cabinet privilege  when it came to their decision on Site C: http://www.alaskahighwaynews.ca/regional-news/site-c/despite-cabinet-secrecy-federal-decision-on-site-c-ok-judge-rules-1.2045577

In the written decision against the PVLA, Judge Michael Manson said the decision by the federal government was justified—even though the government chose not to reveal its reasoning behind the decision to the courts.

In the decision, lawyers for the PVLA argued the federal cabinet only addressed the consultation process with Aboriginal groups and their social interests in their government in council (GIC) order, without also addressing the economic value or including a cumulative effects analysis of the project.

Lawyers argued the government would need to consider whether or not the project was needed for power, and whether or not the project was financially justified—which the group believed the government did not consider.

BC Hydro disagreed, arguing the federal cabinet indeed reflected and considered the overall question of costs, need for, and benefits of Site C.

Manson agreed.

“The concerns and interests of Aboriginal groups have been reasonably balanced with other societal interests including social, economic, policy and the broader public interest,” he wrote in his decision.

However, the full reasoning behind the decision was not made available to the courts.

Manson wrote that cabinet “claimed privilege” to keep the matter private. This complicated his review of the reasons for the decisions, he noted.

“(The federal cabinet) could have chosen to submit redacted versions before them, but decided not to,” he wrote.

Nevertheless, Manson found there was “no basis” that the decision was made without regarding environmental legislation, economic considerations, or that the decision itself was unreasonable.

“While the reasons provided by the GIC could have been better articulated and more transparent, they are within the reasonable boundaries and requirements for GIC reasons,” Manson wrote.

“The GIC must consider a wide range of considerations and information put before it. As a body comprised of elected officials, it is accountable to the electorate: the public itself.”

It’s unclear why government made the decision to claim privilege. Questions sent to Leona Aglukkaq—the federal environment minister at the time the decision was made, and a member of the cabinet in charge of making the decision— were not returned as of press time.


In the best interests of British Columbians concerned about rising Hydro bills, anything less is inexplicable. There is simply too much risk involved: economically,socially and environmentally.






Site C to be debated in BC Legislature today (Sept.30th),rally against the project to be held outside.

When it comes to Site C, I’ve written about it off and on for five years on this blog and have covered several columns on it while debating Brent Stafford in my Duel column for 24Hours Vancouver.

It’s a project that definitely has an emotional angle because it involves the loss of homes, of livelihoods, of generation of history and fertile grounds used for hunting,fishing and agriculture.

It’s also a project that has very questionable financial and political angles, because unlike other projects, the current BC government exempted Site C from the usual regulatory review by the BC Utilities Commission under the Clean Energy Act. Nor has it undergone a review by the ALR Commssion.

People have often asked what the BC Utilities Commission is  and why this matters, so I’ll share this from their site: http://www.bcuc.com/CorpProfile.aspx

Our Mission:

The Commission’s mission is to ensure that ratepayers receive safe, reliable, and nondiscriminatory energy services at fair rates from the utilities it regulates, and that shareholders of those utilities are afforded a reasonable opportunity to earn a fair return on their invested capital.


The Commission also reviews energy-related matters referred to it by Cabinet. These inquiries usually involve public hearings, followed by a report and recommendations to Cabinet.

In the case of Site C, British Columbians who pay dearly already on their hydro bills, will not have that assurance that the project is appropriate or how it will impact ratepayers in the province. Long story short, we could all potentially see our hydro rates go up,a fertile lush valley flooded and one of BC’s heritage rivers changed even more than it has already by the other dams.

The Union of BC Municipalities, ( UBCM) recently passed a resolution at their annual meeting,calling on the province and BC Hydro to stand down on the construction work already underway on Site C, to allow a review by the BC Utilities Commission and the ALR Commission.

BC Hydro has claimed any delay will cost taxpayers $500 million dollars.But I said, and still say, that not building it at all, will save us more than $8 billion dollars. 

Why won’t the premier, who speaks often of fiscal restraint, of the need to be careful with taxpayers money (cough cough), give British Columbians the chance to see if the BC Utilities Commission would approve a project they have already turned down once?

Minister of Energy and Mines ‘Kootenay’ Bill Bennett summed it best perhaps in a news report once: 


Yes that pesky little thing called regulation. So of course this project was exempted.

If you haven’t been to the Peace River region, let me put a face to it for you.

Meet some of the landowners and residents whose lives and lands will be affected by Site C. Some of them, will see their homes destroyed. Look at their photos, read their stories and ask why they too, will not see due process.


These people are preparing for winter right now, in an area that is rich in agriculture and able to grow even watermelons!

Site C crews have now already cleared an island in the river. Work camps are being planned. This isn’t getting the coverage it should and it matters because it is not only the provincial government that can expropriate your land and livelihood,it happens down here on the coast too. 

The issue of Site C will be debated in the Legislature tomorrow and a rally will be held outside – if you can attend, you might consider giving your support. I would be there if I could. The BC government and BC Hydro need to call an immediate halt,regardless of the short term cost. When it comes to a project like this,government needs to ensure they aren’t making a big mistake-right now, we really don’t know to be honest. But why would anyone want to take that chance?

Let the BCUC and the ALC do their jobs and review this project.

Details at the following link:


**This is also, very much an issue for Election 2015. Why did the federal government ministers invoke cabinet privilege,to keep the reasons for supporting Site C, secret? An alarming read from late August,when few were paying attention.


Hindsight is only helpful if you apply the lesson learned to future actions.

It was a day like any other day of my childhood summers; quick breakfast,clothes on and then running out the door to do the morning rounds of the yard.Checking to see where all the salamanders and toads had settled for the night was always the first thing on my mind,since I found both creatures so interesting.

Next up was a stop in the garden to quickly raid the raspberries or pea patch if it was the season-quickly because if mom caught us eating the goods meant to freeze for fall there would be trouble! Our garden wasn’t for looks,it was for necessity.

As I headed off to the edge of the garden to go down to the creek, I stopped  to pull the green bits out of some Indian Paintbrush growing in the ditch, sucking what little nectar a butterfly would find hard to release, with relish.

I loved our road.

At that time there were only a few homes besides ours,all on acreage and surrounded by lovely forests full of kinnickinnick, huckleberries, and native plants I’d weave into vines to make crowns for my hair. Free time in summer was spent looking for agates on the road, riding bikes all over and for me, playing at the creek.

It was on the far bank of the creek where I was exploring that I saw it. A flower unlike anything I had ever seen before anywhere in the forests around our house, or camping in the bush. To a young girl growing up in an area like this, it seemed alien and exotic in comparison to the daisies and Indian paintbrush so common elsewhere.


I sat there for a while, completely in awe. I looked around and could see no others. Where did this flower come from? How did it get here? So many questions for a young girl with no answers.

And then I picked it.

It was wilting even before I could get it home to a glass of water and completely limp shortly afterwards. I had killed it.

I recall very clearly going back and searching the forest floor all around the creek banks on both sides, then going around the forest in the back yard in my desperation to find another, but there were none. I was devastated in the knowledge of what I had willingly, without thought,done.

And for the rest of my years growing up in my childhood home, I never saw another flower like it. Even as an adult visiting home I have looked,although the creek is all but gone now and there are more homes in place of the forests of my youth- to no avail.

I know now, it was a native orchid often found in boreal forests and sub-alpine/alpine meadows in the province, called Calypso Bulbosa, or the Fairy Slipper orchid. I’ve seen them hiking in Whistler and around Manning Park but apparently I picked the only one that somehow found its way to the creek by my yard.

And even as a woman in my forties, I’ll never forget the feeling of regret of my action. I can’t go back and unpick that flower, but I can apply what I learned  in this stark lesson elsewhere. Sadly, I don’t often see that need to reflect in government.

They say hindsight is 20/20- and perhaps it is, but it only serves a purpose if you learn and act accordingly. Otherwise it’s about as useful as smoke in the wind.

For example, the housing and affordability crisis in Vancouver. While it’s still making the news, it’s anything but a new problem. Looking back there have been signs and complaints years for years but to what result? Not much until it now-again-makes the news and politicians muse solutions,spurred only act when public outrage reaches a level that can’t be ignored.

In Delta, farmland is once again under threat of expropriation in a time when drought and climate change is threatening crops elsewhere,creating higher prices in supermarket for many products. Looking back, this isn’t new either, yet I can foresee the day when politicians look back and go:”What the hell were we thinking??” Once that land is gone, it’s gone. Do we want to risk our food security at a local level?

Surrey is still, rampantly deforesting to build and there are stories popping up now of new homes on ALR land approved without due process. The pressures of phenomenal growth without keeping pace with vital social infrastructure is starting to show in ongoing issues around the city. Roads are in crumbles in many areas, yet this has been known and allowed willingly to fester for years. Playing catch-up is never a fun game when it comes to a community.

Forest fires this year already a massive concern, but has the province learned anything from past events? Have forest communities been built differently, more safely? Is scrub being removed, controlled burns being conducted,and are crews sent out early and aggressively enough? According to some people I’ve talked to, no. Communities need to be asking why.

It’s as much about learning from our past, as it is, taking care of the basics. I don’t like the words, shoulda, woulda, coulda….Sometimes you have to take a break, look at what you know and where you have been, so you can figure out the best way forward, for everyone.

Because although I believe it is never too late to change course and head in the right direction, it’s equally true that sometimes you only get one opportunity to really get it right. 

And do you really want to take that chance?

“In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing. The worst thing you can do is nothing.”~ Theodore Roosevelt

“A desk is a dangerous place from which to view the world.” ~ John Le Carre

Wise words for many policy makers who often seem to demonstrate a lack of empathy and understanding of how the real world works for the average person, perhaps because they spend more time behind their desk than out and about connecting with real people

There will be no Duel column next Monday, so I’ll be taking a rest until after the Family day holiday and will be back with a couple of stories,one involving Kiewit- again- next week.

However, today let me share with you this story from Sam Cooper, which serves as a good pre-curser for my story next week.


Vancouver Island RCMP have reopened a high-profile workplace death case that occurred six years ago, investigating under a rarely prosecuted criminal law.

In February 2009, 24-year-old Sam Fitzpatrick was crushed to death by a large boulder while completing a work assignment on a Toba Inlet mountainside. Arlen Fitzpatrick, who worked on site, saw his older brother die.

Unsatisfied with the results of a WorkSafe B.C. probe, their father Brian Fitzpatrick has for years argued that the employer, Omaha-based construction giant Kiewit, is criminally responsible.

He said Thursday that after months of contact with the RCMP, the force recently informed him a fresh investigation is under way.

Great news, and timely considering the recent finding in Washington State for ‘willful and serious safety violations” that put the lives of workers into danger.


See you soon,and enjoy your long weekend here in BC ( this long weekend might be the only real legacy of Premier Clark that’s turned out well!)



No… this did not come from The Onion.  

But seriously…no joking now… considering the recent release of the public accounts I just blogged about... that show that under Christy Clark,Queen of LNG fantasies:

“For a government that sought re-election on the promise, blazoned on the side of the campaign bus, of a “Debt-Free B.C.,” the public accounts released this week provide a sobering reality check.

Total provincial debt as of March 31, the end of the last financial year: $60.693 billion.

Total provincial debt inherited by Christy Clark when she took the oath of office as premier in mid-March 2011: $45.154 billion.

Increase: $15.539 billion, or 34 per cent.”


So, just so I have this correct… humour me now…

The Christy Clark BC Jobs Plan is a dismal failure… http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/reality-check-b-c-s-jobs-plan-1.1401889

The public debt, as shown above, has grown…

And Christy Clark still wants you to invest in a responsible government???

Please tell me that I am not alone in seeing the hypocrisy in this donation request for the 2017 election… or in wondering how much support Premier Christy Clark really has among her own caucus?


… and I haven’t even started on why this is so just so, so wrong, on so many levels… least of which is the lack of attention this government has given to what really matters: Education.


“I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind.”


2013-09-01 022Say what you will about John G. Diefenbaker now, he coined a passage that has become sacred to many devoted Canadians.

I clued in a couple of years ago that things at the federal level were not about to change anytime soon despite the incessant assaults on our science, our media, our people.And incessant they are-hardly a week goes by before media is reporting yet another Harper attack on something.

And I couldn’t stand it then, as I can’t stand it now. There is a continual erosion of the rights and freedoms we built this country on and it’s not coming from an outside source,it’s coming from our own governments.

Despite not agreeing with the complacency, I do sadly understand it- so many Canadians are still so darn polite-eh-and we don’t like rocking the boat!
But does that mean I have to buy into it? No way, no how, not happening.

My parents used to tell me polite people never talk about politics, religion or how much someone makes.

Well, I know I’ve broken all of those rules- sorry Mom and Dad!

I don’t give a crap how much you make as a friend, but I do care how much bureaucrats make in government.

I do care about how much they expense and I do care about where and how the money is spent. Why? Because I see far too many struggling  while far too many in government are living high on the hog. And in a modern country like Canada,that is rich in many ways, that’s not acceptable.

What religion you practice, who you love, who you marry, where you were born, what colour is your skin…is inconsequential to me. I care if you believe in truth,honour and freedom, I care if you worry and help others, if you are a good person inside.

I believe in a hand up, not  a hand out. I believe in helping your neighbor and anyone else who needs it more than you do.

I believe that Canada comes first, as do Canadians. Educate us, employ us, support us, and embrace those of us who dream of all we are able to achieve… as Canadians! We are an incredible melting pot of those whose families have been here forever, and immigrants who came to find a better life, and helped build this country.What makes Canada great is our diversity, our resilence, our inherent strengths.


Vote because your vote IS IMPORTANT… in fact one vote is so incredibly important it can win or lose an election and determine if a riding/city/province/our country moves one step back or two steps forward… yes your one vote can do all that.

Don’t complain to me about anything, if you don’t vote. I truly believe that not voting is one of the biggest problems this country has. People in other countries will die for the right to vote and here, we toss it away as a bothersome task, too disconnected from how politics impacts our personal lives. In Canada, it’s usually about half the population that decides the future of the country.  Friends in foreign lands laugh when I tell them that, they can’t understand why so many people don’t vote.

And all the while those who don’t care are sitting having tea at 2pm, the government is likely lumping in regular average folks who really care about this country enough to attend a protest or two, or learn how to protest, in with the truly sick criminals intent on harm.

…and if me, the mom of 4, who bakes, wipes snot,pulls teeth and tries to make whatever change I can by writing about issues that impact my family, my friends and my readers… well I guess if that puts me in that group or any other, so be it, but I’m as average a Canadian as it gets:

 From 2012:

Tonight, I have two special items for you, at least special to me because of where they came from, and why.

They both concern Canada. Our country – for some like myself, a birthright, for others a choice to find a better life. There was a time, not that long ago, that I outright admit I took our liberties and freedoms here in this great, amazing land for granted. And why not? This is Canada, after all, where as Pierre Burton once said, you know you are one when you can make love in a canoe…without tipping. Beavers chomping, moose munching and kids playing hockey on frozen ponds… the clichés abound when it comes to Canadians and our country.

I love them all, I really do. But to me, what really makes us Canadian is our endless strength and our convictions.

Right now, both are being tested, and sadly, by our own government – a government who many say, and I agree, is selling our country out, putting it at grave risk and forgetting the wonderful people who made this country what it is.

Our arts are being killed, our scientists muzzled and silenced, our environment mismanaged or sold to foreign interests, our personal rights and freedoms are being eroded every day.

Our government seems to have forgotten what country this is, and I think I have become a nationalist(eek) – someone who advocates political independence for our country.

We aren’t politically independent in Canada, nor are we in B.C.

When you have corporate friends who have great influence over political leaders, when you have foreign governments who are paying for educational supplements here, actively lobbying and shaping policy and impacting government affairs,when you have a prime minister who openly tells his country he will overrule due process to make something wrong, right…. I am telling you we do not have political independence.

The wonderful thing is, there are thousands of others just like me, and we are finding each other, and talking and informing everyone we can.

One person at a time if need be,and you know something special is happening when a reader,( whom I also consider a new friend), stops on her road trip across Canada to send you a photo, from the Gordie Howe campground in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan because she knows exactly what I will think of it. ( doesn’t get more Canadian than driving across the country in a camper..)

Here is her email from today:

“Hi Laila,

I just thought I would send these not so great photos to you… the one with Harper quoted re: Dief! What a total joke for Harper to even be quoted for one thing and to call himself a Tory! I grew up thinking the Conservatives knew what they were about due to Diefenbaker but those days are long past and only a few good old boys are trying to call Harper into line…

Anyway…how one man can change a nation so quickly…for the worse!

Keep writing…my husband and I are doing our first trip in a small camper across Canada …and reminiscing about Canada along the way…and hope to be in Ottawa for July 1st and I will be wearing my anti Enbridge T-shirt with my save our salmon hoodie! “

Best, Barb

Well, the photos were all great, and here is one photo that I think speaks volumes!!The irony is clear and I am sure old Dief would be turning in his grave if he saw this.

Clearly Harper didn’t learn a hell of a lot from Diefenbaker, now did he? That’s all I am going to say about that.

( I will be featuring more photos from Barb and her hubby’s trip across Canada, since I asked her to continue to send photos to me of things that really stood out for her along the way,things she felt were really Canadian)


The second special item for you comes from Priscilla Judd, whom I met while covering the No Prison for Lumby story. Her heart is true, and spirit strong… and talent…immense.

Priscilla writes:

“Life is very much better in Lumby without the fight over a prison but this Federal Government (supported by BC Liberals)  is tearing apart our country – fast. I’ve been busy working lately and writing songs. Anyway, my husband made a video to help me share one of them.I’m sending you my song URL in hopes that first: you like it and second, I’m hoping you will share it.

It’s easy to sing… I have performed it at two protests and it seems to unite people. I hope it goes around in your head and you can remember it if you feel like giving up – I know I do – times are bleak… So let me know how the song works for you – many thanks

in peace


I opened the link, listened to the song and smiled.

Yes, it really struck me, the beauty, the truth of that song, and if I had my way this would be our new anthem because it speak to all we hold strong , true and free in Canada.  Yes Priscilla, this works for me just fine!!

Listen. Reflect. Enjoy. Will you stand beside me, and stand up for British Columbia, for Canada when they need us most? To remain, the true north, strong and FREE.


“O Canada we’ve all agreed to
stand for the true north strong and free
with glowing hearts from sea to sea
we stand on guard for thee

O Canada on Native land
we wash the oil from tar and sand
from pipe to power this darkest hour
from sea to shining sea

But who stands watch for the earth below?
stands for the ice and the melting snow?
who for the land to call our home?
Oh Canada I don’t know

O Canada with fossil soil
we frack the gas and mine the coal
for carbon power this darkest hour
from sea to shining sea

but Who looks out for the prairie sky?
stands for the air so none of us die?
who for wind and the birds that fly?
where the planet goes there go I

O Canada from forest green
we ship the logs and cut the trees
and there for the river that meets the sea
with mud and logging debris

O Canada O Canada
who stands watch from sea to sea?
who for a lost democracy?
who for the true north strong and free?

if not you then let it be me”

Priscilla Judd.

Now go and out enjoy the day with your family, your friends, neighbours and community. Celebrate the good, celebrate this incredible country and just enjoy life.

There is time to fight the good fight when it’s all done. :)


This weeks column for 24Hrs Vancouver: BC Hydro hasn’t made a convincing case for pushing costly dam onto taxpayers

Columnists Laila Yuile and Brent Stafford battle over the issues of the day. The winner of last week’s duel on the Temporary Foreign Worker Program was Laila with 71%.

This week’s topic:

Considering the results of the Joint Review Panel report on BC Hydro’s Site C dam, should government approve the project?

A police officer I know once told me that if two people saw the same crime in progress from beginning to end, he would still likely get two different stories from the witness statements.

Likewise, instead of the “clear path to a green light” for the Site C dam that Brent believes the Joint Review Panel report provides, after reading it in full, I see nothing but a giant red light.

There are several great concerns noted in the 471-page report, but one of several key points that should throw up red flags for all British Columbians is this: “The panel concludes that the proponent has not fully demonstrated the need for the project on the timetable set forth.”

The proponent is BC Hydro, a Crown corporation that seems to be used to further the BC Liberals’ political agenda more than it is used to provide affordable energy for British Columbians. The Site C proposal is a perfect example of this.

Read Brent Stafford’s column

Over the years, the public has been presented with a changing list of justifications for the Site C proposal. From powering homes in British Columbia, to being essential to power LNG development in the province — a Premier Christy Clark favourite — to exporting power to drought-stricken California, the reasons seem to keep changing.

The questions keep mounting as to why the BC Liberals and BC Hydro are pushing this proposal so hard on a public already burdened by rising hydro costs….

READ the rest of this weeks column, comment and vote at : http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/2014/05/11/bc-hydro-hasnt-made-a-convincing-case-for-pushing-costly-dam-onto-taxpayers

*** You can read the entire study I have referenced in this column here, in PDF format : dam cost overruns

This week’s column for 24Hrs Vancouver: Changing the rules doesn’t make LNG ‘clean’ energy

Yes, yes, yes, I know I’ve teased you with hints of the post on the BC NDP, and a couple other gems, but I’ve come down sick with a nasty head cold and cough that makes me feel like my brain is cotton.  Thankfully,I managed to get this weeks column done just as I was starting to get sick, but that’s going to be it for a day or two until this passes.

This week, Brent and I debate this question” Are LNG profits worth the trade-offs in B.C.’s greenhouse gas emissions targets?

I say no, but this is a tricky question to debate  because as the narrative gets pushed along that burning LNG is dirty, so begins the push for Site C and other ‘clean’ projects – regardless if they could even be constructed in time to run any LNG plants on Clarks timeline. Therein lies the real danger of these debates.


The BC Liberals, under the leadership of former premier Gordon Campbell, passed the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Targets Act in 2007, requiring the province reduce emissions by at least 33% by 2020.

A lofty goal, and one the province has adhered to. Now Premier Christy Clark and her liquefied natural gas dreams could change all that.

Clark has found herself under fire from critics over her claims that B.C.’s proposed LNG facilities will be the cleanest in the world. In fact, she has gone as far as saying they will do the world a “favour,” a comment predicated on her theory that exported B.C. LNG could replace the use of coal in China, thereby reducing world air pollution.

Like all things that seem too good to be true, her claims of B.C. having the cleanest LNG facilities in the world one day are as premature and foolhardy as her assertions about related job creation and profits.

The Clark government knows that natural gas would most likely be needed to power the proposed LNG plants. Knowing this, the Clean Energy Act was changed in 2012 — meaning from that point on any natural gas burned to fuel LNG plants was to be considered “clean energy.” In fact, it is anything but clean.

Read Brent Stafford’s column


READ the rest of this weeks column, and vote for whom you think should win this weeks debate here: http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/2013/11/24/changing-the-rules-doesnt-make-lng-clean-energy

Silence is the ultimate weapon of power. -Charles de Gaulle

Just this last summer, I discovered one of the few remaining gems in B.C., one I happily admit I will only share the location of with my trusted friends.

2013-09-01 022What more could you possibly want from this province? Stunning hills and mountains, unadulterated natural,see- yourself- in- the- mirror- pristine lakes filled with whatever nature intended to be there…and all to yourself.

No clearcuts visible ( a rarity in the province of BC, as those who travel here know!) No invasive species dumped in the lake and surrounding areas from wannabe pet owners tired of turtles/koi/carp/bunnies and whatever else has been deemed a socially acceptable pet fad.

In short, a bit of heaven here on earth, or at least what I would want heaven to look like,coming from a woman who was born and raised in the northern interior.

Sad thing is, Christy do-anything-to-make- even- a- tiny-buck-for-this-debt-ridden-province- Clark, is putting this and many more locations like this at risk to not only balance the budget for 2014, but actually make it look like there is hope for the years beyond that.

And…the BC NDP sure as hell are not doing anything to change that.

More on that tomorrow.

For now, appreciate what we have… while we actually have it.